Solar Extreme Events of 2003:
Fundamental Science and Applied Aspects

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CORONAS-F/SPIRIT OBSERVATIONS OF SOLAR ERUPTIVE EVENTS ON 23 OCTOBER - 4 NOVEMBER 2003
Kuzin S.V., Chertok I.M., Grechnev V.V., Slemzin V.A., Ignat'ev A.P., Pertsov A.A., Zhitnik I.A., Delaboudiniere J.-P.,

An extremely high solar activity during the first rotation of the complex of active regions 484, 486, and 488 was observed with the SPectrographIc X-Ray Imaging Telescope (SPIRIT) aboard the CORONAS-F spacecraft in the EUV coronal line 175 line. Based on these observations, we have analyzed large-scale activity associated with several halo-type coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and powerful X-class flares of October -November 2003. The objects of our interest are large-scale disturbances, in particular, dimmings (i.e. transient coronal holes) living several hours. The analysis includes consideration of both the original heliograms and derotated fixed difference SPIRIT images. The latter are formed by 3D rotation of all heliograms to the time the reference frame before the event and its subsequent subtraction from all derotated heliograms. It is shown that in the observed eruptive events, CMEs and flares were accompanied by similar large-scale dimmings occupying the entire south half of the disk and mainly stretching between three remote active regions. The most extending narrow dimming was observed in the south high-latitude sector. These results are confirmed by comparison with corresponding SOHO/EIT heliograms at 195 . It is noted that the SPIRIT heliograms, in contrast to EIT images, were neither saturated by extremely intense flare emission, nor affected by very strong energetic particle fluxes due to the low orbit of the spacecraft inside the Earth's magnetosphere.





Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow State University, 2004