Solar Extreme Events of 2003:
Fundamental Science and Applied Aspects

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SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLE EVENTS OF OCTOBER-NOVEMBER 2003: VIEW FROM ULYSSES
Heber B., Struminsky A., Kallerode M.-B., Muller-Mellin R., Klassen A., Kunow H.,

The Ulysses spacecraft was at heliocentric distance of 5.2 AU with heliographic coordinates 06N120W during the solar energetic particle events of October-November 2003. The observed enhancement is a result of complex interference of several sources, working close to the Sun, and particle propagation in the heliosphere. We analyze the intensity time-profiles measured within four proton channels of Ulysses KET beginning from October 26 till November 26, 2003 and underline following: 1) only 5-25 MeV solar protons arrived on October 26, but their majority reached Ulysses several days later with solar wind disturbances; 2) for proton energies above 38 MeV the enhancement started only on October 28; 3) double peak (diffusive and storm) structure for 38-125 MeV protons with nearly equal number of particles in each peak; 4) only the first diffusive maximum for 125-200 MeV and 200-2000 MeV protons with clear Forbush-like decrease later. Ulysses observed the solar energetic particle events of October 30 and November 2, 1992 from a similar position in the heliosphere. In both cases time-profiles are similar during first 70 hours since the parent X-ray onset: a particle onset is delayed by 11-12 hours and a flat maximum intensity is registered 25-30 hours later. This implies the same mechanism of proton propagation along more than 12 AU for events occurred in different interplanetary conditions. Propagating IMF disturbances apparently modulated the proton flux and other parent solar flares contributed to the observed intensities later, when the time profiles were considerably different.





Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow State University, 2004